Titanium dioxide in vitamins: is it safe for human consumption?

20 May 2017 Articles

Because I take a large number of nutritional supplements, I’ve become increasingly concerned over the years about supplement excipients, binders and fillers. One ingredient frequently used in vitamin manufacturing is titanium dioxide, a nanoparticle powder made of fine titanium bits. It’s best known as an ingredient in sunscreen, but it’s also used in thousands of cosmetic products as well as nutritional products.

Yep, if you take certain vitamins made by GNC or Centrum (as well as hundreds of other companies), you are eating titanium dioxide. And this is an ingredient for which no long-term safety testing on humans has ever been conducted. In fact, according to the Canadian Center for Occupational Health and Safety, titanium dioxide may be a human carcinogen. As explained on the CCOHS website: (http://www.ccohs.ca/headlines/text186.html)

Titanium dioxide has recently been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as an IARC Group 2B carcinogen ”possibly carcinogen to humans”… This evidence showed that high concentrations of pigment-grade (powdered) and ultrafine titanium dioxide dust caused respiratory tract cancer in rats exposed by inhalation and intratracheal instillation*.

CosmeticsDatabase.com lists titanium dioxide as being linked to cancer, allergies, immunotoxicity and organ system toxicity, among other problems. (http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/ingredient….) Here’s a list of some of the many thousands of cosmetic products containing titanium dioxide: http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/browse.php?…

That list, by the way, includes products from many well-known brands.

Titanium Dioxide in Supplements

Centrum vitamins are the No. 1 selling brand of vitamins in the U.S. It is made with synthetic vitamins. The ingredients label reads like a mish-mash of synthetic chemicals and low-cost ingredients with marginal absorption capability: (I’m bolding some of the more concerning ingredients below…)

Ingredients for Centrum Silver Ultra Women’s Tablets:

Calcium Carbonate, Potassium Chloride, Pregelatinized Corn Starch, Ascorbic Acid (Vit. C), Dibasic Calcium Phosphate, Magnesium Oxide, Crospovidone. Contains < 2% of: Acacia, Ascorbyl Palmitate, Beta-Carotene, BHT, Biotin, Boric Acid, Calcium Pantothenate, Calcium Stearate, Cholecalciferol (Vit. D3), Chromium Picolinate, Citric Acid, Corn Starch, Cupric Sulfate, Cyanocobalamin (Vit. B12), dl-Alpha Tocopheryl Acetate (Vit. E), FD&C Blue No. 2 Aluminum Lake, FD&C Red No. 40 Aluminum Lake, Ferrous Fumarate, Folic Acid, Gelatin, Hydrogenated Palm Oil, Hypromellose, Lecithin, Lutein, Magnesium Stearate, Manganese Sulfate, Medium-Chain Triglycerides, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Modified Food Starch, Niacinamide, Nickelous Sulfate, Phytonadione (Vit. K), Polyethylene Glycol, Polyvinyl Alcohol, Potassium Iodide, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vit. B6), Riboflavin (Vit. B2), Silicon Dioxide, Sodium Ascorbate, Sodium Benzoate, Sodium Borate, Sodium Citrate, Sodium Metavanadate, Sodium Molybdate, Sodium Selenate, Sorbic Acid, Sucrose, Talc, Thiamine Mononitrate (Vit. B1), Titanium Dioxide, Tocopherols, Vitamin A Acetate (Vit. A), Zinc Oxide. May also contain < 2% of: Maltodextrin, Sodium Aluminosilicate, Sunflower Oil, Tribasic Calcium Phosphate. Contains: Soy.

Did you notice the artificial coloring chemicals, hydrogenated palm oil and the low-grade form of vitamin B12? Did you see that these vitamins contain talc and sodium benzoate? Check out this wiki page on Crospovidone, which is also found in the Centrum formula: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyvinylpyrrol…

Notice, too, that this formula contains titanium dioxide. It’s also found in numerous products from GNC, including this probiotic formula: http://www.gnc.com/product/index.jsp?product…

In fact, here’s a Google search that returns 382 pages on GNC.com that mention titanium dioxide: http://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1GGLS_en-…

Vitacost bans titanium dioxide from in-house brands

Titanium dioxide is considered extremely unsafe by Vitacost, which banned the ingredient from its in-house supplements label (NSI). Soon, products from Vitacost (www.Vitacost.com) may even be labeled with a “titanium dioxide free” claim to better educate consumers.

The high-quality nutritional supplement manufacturers recommended on NaturalNews, of course, don’t use titanium dioxide. You’ll never find it in products from New Chapter (www.NewChapter.com) or Pure Synergy (www.TheSynergyCompany.com), for example. It’s not in Dragon Herbs (www.DragonHerbs.com), Mushroom Science (www.MushroomScience.com) or Global Healing Center (www.GlobalHealingCenter.com). These are quality product companies that wouldn’t even think of using titanium dioxide in dietary supplements intended for consumption.

In fact, Dr. Ed Group’s GHC website offers this excellent overview of the dangers of titanium dioxide: http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/dangers-o…

Most of the current debate about titanium dioxide concerns its topical use and deals with the particle size of the titanium. Coarse particles are believed to be relatively safe for topical use because they cannot be absorbed by the skin. But nano particles may pose a greater risk because there is concern they can be readily absorbed through the skin and enter the bloodstream. As explained by the Environmental Working Group, “Relative to larger particles, nano-scale materials can be more chemically reactive and more easily absorbed into the body. A number of studies raise concerns about potential health risks when these particles are inhaled or are absorbed through the skin or gut. Nevertheless, they are already widely used in products, including sunscreens, with no requirement that their presence be disclosed.”

That same page, however, (http://www.ewg.org/cosmetics/report/sunscree…) admits there are few studies that have really looked at the titanium dioxide nano particle absorption issue in regards to cosmetics. EWG concludes titanium dioxide is unlikely to be absorbed by the skin, but it calls for more studies to be sure.

There are even fewer studies that look at whether titanium dioxide is safe for human ingestion, and that’s potentially a far more serious issue. Although vitamin manufacturers will of course claim “there’s no evidence of harm” from titanium dioxide in nutritional supplements, the reason there’s no evidence is because they haven’t done any long-term safety tests on titanium dioxide.

The “common sense test” asks the question: Does titanium dioxide occur naturally in the indigenous human food supply? The answer to that is, of course, absolutely not. That’s why holistic nutritionists and nutritionally-aware consumers are increasingly seeking to avoid this ingredient in anything they eat or swallow. If it’s not part of the food supply in nature, and if it hasn’t been proven safe for human consumption, why would you want to introduce an unnatural chemical into your diet in the first place?

The jury is still out on titanium dioxide, but until it’s proven safe, NaturalNews recommends readers avoid this ingredient and only purchase nutritional supplements made without it. Fortunately, there are a great many supplement brands available today without titanium dioxide (and other bizarre excipients). Just read the ingredients labels before you buy.

Additional sources for this story:
http://www.naturalpedia.com/titanium_dioxide…

Benefits of drinking grass-fed milk

Grass-fed cows are kept on grass pastures, where they can roam freely and eat grass.  On the other hand, grain-fed cows are kept in confined spaces called CAFOs (Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations), which are very nasty places. Typically the cows are fed a diet of GMO (genetically-modified) grains based on soy and corn.  They are also injected with hormones (to make them grow faster) and antibiotics (to survive the unsanitary conditions).  Grass-fed milk contains significantly more Omega-3 fats, Vitamin E, beta carotene and CLA than grain-fed milk.

Does your protein contain the following toxic substances?

rBGH (recombinant bovine growth hormone)
-used to increase milk production
-banned in Belgium but widely used in USA
-a genetically modified organism (GMO)
-possibly carcinogenic

Sucralose
-an artificial sweetener
-reduce good bacteria in guts
-causes leukemia in lab mice
-possibly carcinogenic

Acesulfame potassium
-an artificial sweetener
-brain damaging
-possibly carcinogenic

References:

1. rBGH ​https://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancer-causes/recombinant-bovine-growth-hormone.html


2. Study links sucralose to higher risk of leukemia: http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2016/03/11/Study-links-Splenda-to-higher-risk-of-leukemia/3741457711872/


3. Acesulfame potasssium danger: http://www.naturalnews.com/041510_Acesulfame-K_methylene_chloride_carcinogen.html

Omega-3 fatty acids will help you lose weight

13 Jan 2017 Articles

Folks now have another tool in their arsenal to help them lose weight, and it’s omega-3 fatty acids, according to the results of a new study conducted in Australia.

Researchers at the University of South Australia took a group of 75 people who were diagnosed as being either overweight or obese and who had cardiovascular disease risk factors such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels, and split them into four groups.

In the first split, half were given doses of tuna fish oil while the other two groups were given equal amounts of sunflower oil, which contains no omega-3 acids. Both groups were then split once more, with half taking no additional exercise each week while the others completed three 45-minute runs, to 75 percent of their maximum heart rates, each week. All participants were asked not to otherwise alter their diets.

Omega-3 and exercise will do more than just exercise to help you shed pounds

After three weeks, three of the groups did not show much change, but the group that was given the fish oil and had exercised had an average weight loss of about 4.5 pounds and a decrease in overall body fat percentage.

Following eight weeks, “a significant three-way interaction between time, group and gender was observed for percentage reduction in weight… with a greater percentage decrease for females in FO compared to PB for weight (-7.21 percent vs. -5.82 percent) and BMI (body mass index) (-7.43 percent vs. -5.91 percent respectively),” said a summary of the study, which was published in the February 2013 issue of the journal Food & Function.

“The results seem more impressive given that no other changes to eating habits were made. Also, the exercise ‘regime’ was not much more than the recommended levels for everyone; not just those trying to lose weight,” writes dietician Juliette Kellow, in WeightLossResources, an online nutrition journal based in Britain. “When combined with a calorie-counted diet and increased exercise, the effects of fish oil on weight loss could prove substantial.”

Scientists believe that omega-3 oil improves blood flow to muscles during exercise, and that the compound helps stimulate enzymes that transport fat to where it can be stored for energy.

The good news is, omega-3 is widely available as a supplement on the retail market, and as an additive in certain foods and drinks. It’s use has become more popular as a growing body of research continues to uncover new benefits it offers, such as better brain and memory function and greater eye development and sustainment, as well as an ability to reduce risks of stroke and contracting Alzheimer’s disease.

A diet rich in omega-3 is key to longevity

Kellow notes that additional, longer studies are being planned to help scientists better understand the full effects of omega-3 supplementation, especially over an extended period of time and in conjunction with greater amounts of exercise. “Although taking omega-3 in its natural form (from fish for example) may give the greatest benefits,” she writes, “omega-3 fish oil supplements could be an effective natural weight loss supplement to combine with an exercise program.”

Previous studies of omega-3 have found that in countries where it is a well-integrated part of the normal diet, such as in Japan and Norway, people tend to live longer.

“…[C]ountries that consume omega-3 regularly such as (Japan and Norway) have higher life expectancy rates compared to parts of the world that have adopted the Western diet. Furthermore, the rate of obesity is significantly lower among those whose diets are rich in omega-3 fatty acids,” says Omega3.org.

Sources:

http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/40581

http://www.weightlossresources.co.uk

http://www.omega3.org/can-fish-oil-help-you-lose-weight.html

Creating An Anabolic State That Creates Muscle Growth

You can only build muscle if your body is in the correct anabolic balance to allow growth to take place. Intensive exercise is clearly an important part of the muscle building process but achieving the maximum muscle mass depends on putting the building blocks in place. This is achieved through sound nutritional practices so you need to be aware of the following anabolic enhancing principles:

1. Protein is the basic raw material needed to build muscle. Protein supplies the amino acids that the body uses to repair and build muscle following intensive exercise. Aim to consume 1 to 1.5 grams of protein per pound of body weight each day from food like beef, fish, poultry, eggs, milk and whey. Spread the load over at least six meals to derive the optimum benefit and avoid overloading the liver.
2. Carbohydrates are needed to energize the muscle building process. Carbohydrates stimulate the release of insulin which pushes the amino acids into muscle cells to begin the process of repair. The body uses carbohydrates as a source of energy – consume too little and the body will steal protein that would otherwise be used for repairing and building muscle. Aim to consume 1.5 to 2 grams of carbohydrate per pound of body weight each day from foods like potatoes, pasta, rice, vegetables and whole wheat bread.
3. Boost your calories. Unless your main aim is to reduce fat you need a positive caloric balance if you want to build muscle. Make sure that your daily calorie intake is 10% higher than your energy expenditure for daily maintenance and that the calories are acquired from a diet characterized by a ratio of 50% carbohydrates, 40% proteins and 10% fat.
4. Get plenty of rest both in terms of adequate rest days between training sessions and sufficient sleep. Your muscles won’t grow if you don’t build adequate recovery time into your training program. Similarly, you can only optimize your body’s levels of testosterone and growth hormone if you spend enough time sleeping.
5. Consume quality supplements to support a sound nutritious diet. For most people it should be enough to add whey protein, creatine and l-glutamine to your daily diet.
6. Don’t overdo the aerobic exercise. Your aim is to increase muscle mass therefore you don’t want to burn excessive calories that could be utilized for bulking up.
7. Drink plenty of water. Failure to drink sufficient quantities of water will lead to dehydration and adversely affect your muscle mass. Don’t forget that muscle is 70% water so a generous intake will maintain muscle volume and help growth.

Canola Oil: Is It Good Or Bad?

Canola oil is not a natural food. It is a genetically-engineered product made from rapeseed oil. Although the FDA supports label claims that it benefits heart health, there have been mounting evidence that it in fact promotes heart diseases. We at White Knight refuses to use canola oil, whereas our competition’s products are swimming in it, and they have no idea if canola oil is bad for your health or not. Check under Ingredients to see if a product contains canola oil. Read more here….

Benefits of Creatine (UPDATED)

According to Medline Plus, A service of the US National Library of Medicine, under the National Institute of Health, creatine is described as follows:
What is it?

Creatine is a chemical that is normally found in the body, mostly in muscles. It is made by the body and can also be obtained from certain foods. Fish and meats are good sources of creatine. Creatine can also be made in the laboratory.
Creatine is most commonly used for improving exercise performance and increasing muscle mass in athletes and older adults. There is some science supporting the use of creatine in improving the athletic performance of young, healthy people during brief high-intensity activity such as sprinting. But older adults don’t seem to benefit. Creatine doesn’t seem to improve strength or body composition in people over 60.
Creatine use is widespread among professional and amateur athletes and has been acknowledged by well-known athletes such as Mark McGuire, Sammy Sosa, and John Elway. Following the finding that carbohydrate solution further increases muscle creatine levels more than creatine alone, creatine sports drinks have become popular.
Creatine is allowed by the International Olympic Committee, National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), and professional sports. However, the NCAA no longer allows colleges and universities to supply creatine to their students with school funds. Students are permitted to buy creatine on their own and the NCAA has no plans to ban creatine unless medical evidence indicates that it is harmful. With current testing methods, detection of supplemental creatine use would not be possible.
In addition to improving athletic performance, creatine is used for congestive heart failure (CHF), depression, bipolar disorder, Parkinson’s disease, diseases of the muscles and nerves, an eye disease called gyrate atrophy, and high cholesterol. It is also used to slow the worsening of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease), rheumatoid arthritis, McArdle’s disease, and for various muscular dystrophies.
Americans use more than 4 million kilograms of creatine each year.
How effective is it?
Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.
The effectiveness ratings for CREATINE are as follows:
Possibly effective for…
Improving the athletic performance of young, healthy people during brief, high-intensity exercise such as sprinting. Many factors seem to influence the effectiveness of creatine, including the fitness level and age of the person using it, the type of sport, and the dose. Creatine does not seem to improve performance in aerobic exercises, or benefit older people. Also, creatine does not seem to increase endurance or improve performance in highly trained athletes. There is some evidence that creatine “loading,” using 20 grams daily for 5 days, may be more effective than continuous use. But remember, there is still some uncertainty about exactly who can benefit from creatine and at what dose. Studies to date have included small numbers of people (all have involved fewer than 40 participants), and it is not possible to draw firm conclusions from such small numbers.
Parkinson’s disease. Creatine might slow the worsening of some symptoms in people with early Parkinson’s disease.
Increasing strength and endurance in people with heart failure.
Increasing strength in people with muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophy.
Slowing loss of sight in an eye disease called gyrate atrophy.
Improving symptoms of a muscle disease called McArdle’s disease. There is some evidence that taking high-dose creatine daily can increase exercise capacity and decrease exercise-induced muscle pain in some patients with McArdle’s disease.
Possibly ineffective for…
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Taking creatine can increase muscle strength in people with RA, but it doesn’t seem to help them function better physically.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease). Taking creatine orally doesn’t seem to slow disease progression or improve survival in people with ALS.
Insufficient evidence to rate effectiveness for…
Muscle diseases such as polymyositis and dermatomyositis. Early studies suggest taking creatine might produce small improvements in muscle strength in people with these conditions.
High cholesterol.
Huntington’s disease.
Depression.
Bipolar disorder.
Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of creatine for these uses.
How does it work?
Creatine is involved in making the energy muscles need to work.
Vegetarians and other people who have lower total creatine levels when they start taking creatine supplements seem to get more benefit than people who start with a higher level of creatine. Skeletal muscle will only hold a certain amount of creatine; adding more won’t raise levels any more. This “saturation point” is usually reached within the first few days of taking a “loading dose.”
Are there safety concerns?
Creatine is LIKELY SAFE for most people when used at recommended doses. Creatine can cause stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea, and muscle cramping.
When taken by mouth in high doses, creatine is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. There is some concern that it could harm the kidney, liver, or heart function. However, a connection between high doses and these negative effects has not been proven.
Creatine causes muscles to draw water from the rest of your body. Be sure to drink extra water to make up for this. Also, if you are taking creatine, don’t exercise in the heat. It might cause you to become dehydrated.
Many people who use creatine gain weight. This is because creatine causes the muscles to hold water, not because it actually builds muscle.
There is some concern that combining creatine with caffeine and the herb ephedra (also called Ma Huang) might increase the chance of having serious side effects such as stroke.
There is concern that creatine might cause irregular heartbeat in some people. But more information is needed to know if creatine can cause this problem.
There is concern that creatine might cause a skin condition called pigmented purpuric dermatosis in some people. But more information is needed to know if creatine can cause this problem.
Special precautions & warnings:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of creatine during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.
Kidney disease or diabetes: Don’t use creatine if you have kidney disease or a disease such as diabetes that increases your chance of developing kidney disease. There is some concern that creatine might make kidney disease worse.
Are there interactions with medications?
Moderate
Be cautious with this combination.
Medications that can harm the kidneys (Nephrotoxic Drugs)
Taking high doses of creatine might harm the kidneys. Some medications can also harm the kidneys. Taking creatine with other medications that can harm the kidneys might increase the chance of kidney damage.
Some of these medications that can harm the kidneys include cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); aminoglycosides including amikacin (Amikin), gentamicin (Garamycin, Gentak, others), and tobramycin (Nebcin, others); nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprelan, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene); and numerous others.
Are there interactions with herbs and supplements?
Caffeine
There is some concern that combining caffeine, ephedra, and creatine might increase the risk of serious adverse effects. There is a report of stroke in an athlete who consumed creatine monohydrate 6 grams, caffeine 400-600 mg, ephedra 40-60 mg, and a variety of other supplements daily for 6 weeks. Caffeine might also decrease creatine’s beneficial effects on athletic performance.
Ephedra
There is some concern that combining ephedra, caffeine, and creatine might increase the risk of serious adverse effects. There is a report of stroke in an athlete who consumed creatine monohydrate 6 grams, caffeine 400-600 mg, ephedra 40-60 mg, and a variety of other supplements daily for 6 weeks.
Are there interactions with foods?
Carbohydrates
Combining carbohydrates with creatine can increase muscle creatine levels more than creatine alone. Supplementing 5 grams of creatine with 93 grams of simple carbohydrates 4 times daily for 5 days can increase muscle creatine levels as much as 60% more than creatine alone.
What dose is used?
The following doses have been studied in scientific research:
BY MOUTH:
For improving physical performance, several dosing regimens have been tried:
Creatine is typically loaded with 20 grams per day (or 0.3 grams per kg) for 5 days followed by a maintenance dose of 2 or more grams (0.03 grams per kg) daily, Although 5 day loading is typical, 2 days of loading has also been used.
A loading dose of 9 grams per day for 6 days has also been used. Some sources suggest that, instead of acutely loading, similar results can be obtained with 3 grams per day for 28 days.
During creatine supplementation, the water intake should be 64 ounces per day.
For heart failure: 20 grams per day for 5-10 days.
For Parkinson’s disease:
10 grams/day.
A loading dose of creatine 20 grams/day for 6 days followed by 2 grams/day for 6 months, and then 4 grams daily for 18 months has also been used.
For improving resistance training in people with Parkinson’s disease: a loading dose of 20 grams/day for 5 days, followed by 5 grams/day.
For gyrate atrophy: 1.5 grams per day.
For muscular dystrophies: 10 grams per day has been used by adults and 5 grams per day has been used by children.
For McArdle’s disease: 150 mg / kg daily for 5 days and then continue with 60 mg / kg / day.
Cognitive Ability
A placebo-controlled double-blind experiment found that a group of subjects (composed of vegetarians and vegans) who took 5 grams of creatine per day for six weeks showed a significant improvement on two separate tests of fluid intelligence, Raven’s Progressive Matrices, and the backward digit span test from the WAIS. The treatment group was able to repeat longer sequences of numbers from memory and had higher overall IQ scores than the control group. The researchers concluded that “supplementation with creatine significantly increased intelligence compared with placebo.” A subsequent study found that creatine supplements improved cognitive ability in the elderly.

White Knight uses German creatine, supplied by the German company SKW, certified to a purity level of 99.9%. Many competing brands use cheaper sources imported from China, purity of which ranging from 96-98%. Impure creatine typically contains dicyandiamide and dihydrotriazine, which are potentially harmful to health.

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